What to Eat if You Get Constipated

What to Eat if You Get Constipated Constipation is the opposite of diarrhea – it’s when stool tends to stick around longer than necessary. Often it’s drier, lumpier, and harder than normal, and may be difficult to pass. Constipation often comes along with abdominal pain and bloating. And can be common in people with certain gut issues, like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). About 14-24% of adults experience constipation. Constipation becomes chronic when it happens at least three times per week for three months. Constipation can be caused by diet or stress, and even changes to our daily routine. Sometimes the culprit is a medical condition or…

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Pros and Cons of Elimination Diets

Pros and Cons of Elimination Diets Our digestive system is a huge portal in our bodies. Lots of things can get in there that aren’t always good for us. And because the system is so complex (knowing which tiny molecules to absorb, and which keep out), lots can go wrong. And that’s one reason why 70% of our immune system lives in and around our digestive system. This makes food allergies, sensitivities, and intolerances a huge contribution to an array of symptoms all over our bodies. Things like autoimmune issues, inflammation, and even our moods can be affected by what we eat. If you have digestive…

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What Makes Broccoli and Kale Superfoods?

What Makes Broccoli and Kale Superfoods?   Broccoli and kale are often touted to be “superfoods.” And, yes, they really are amazingly healthy for you.   If you’re wondering what exactly is in these green powerhouses that makes them so “super,” I’ve dived into the research to give you some nerdy reasons to make these a staple in your diet.  To start, they are both considered cruciferous vegetables related to each other in the Brassica family. This family of super plants also includes cauliflower, cabbage, mustard greens, and Brussels sprouts.   These superfoods have a ton of nutrition, and other health-promoting compounds. They are relatively inexpensive and…

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What Makes a Food Processed?

 The world of food can be so confusing at times. There was a time when it was clear what food was – it came directly from nature – whether foraging, hunting, or farming.    Now there are so many things we eat that don’t resemble a natural food.   Michael Pollan has a famous quote, he said:   Eat Food – Not too much – Mostly Plants  And in his famous book, In Defense of Food, he defines what food should be. He says, “Don’t eat anything your great-great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.”   And, we can all agree that some things are obviously not recognizable…

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Thickeners – What You Need to Know

Thickeners are one of many ingredients added to processed foods. And they do just that: thicken. They absorb water and form a gel-like consistency. They’re often used to make foods thick and creamy, without having to add a lot of fat. Thickeners also tend to emulsify and stabilize foods they’re added to. Emulsification allows fats and water to mix better and prevents them from separating (i.e., oil/vinegar salad dressing versus a thicker or creamier emulsified dressing). And “stabilizing” helps the product have a longer shelf-life before the “best before” date. Thickeners are often found in canned dairy-free milk and any…

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What to do About a Leaky Gut

Leaky gut is also known as increased intestinal permeability. It’s when the cells lining our intestines (gut) separate a bit from each other. They’re supposed to be nice and tightly joined to the cell beside it; this is to allow certain things into our bodies (like nutrients), and keep other things out. When the tight junctions between intestinal cells weaken it can cause the gut to be more permeable – leakier – than normal. When this happens, it allows things into our bodies that should not get in; things like large pieces of protein, toxins, or even bacteria and waste….

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Low Carb Diet 101

Low carb diets have been popular on and off since the dawn of the Atkins fame (and maybe even earlier?). But, what exactly defines low carb? Does eating this way actually help with weight loss? Are there any other health benefits (or risks) to eating fewer carbs? Let’s see. What is a carb?  A carb, or carbohydrate, is one of our three main macronutrients. Carbs, along with protein and fat that are needed for optimal health in quantities larger than vitamins and minerals which are micronutrients. Carbohydrates come in three main types: Sugars Starches Fibre Sugars are the smallest (molecule)…

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If You Take Medications, You Need to Know About Grapefruit.

Grapefruit is good for you! It’s a vitamin C-rich citrus fruit that’s low in sugar and contains vitamin A, potassium, and fibre. It has a low glycemic index and does not spike your blood sugar when you eat it. The pink and red varieties also contain lycopene. It’s definitely a nutritious health-promoting food. It even had a whole weight-loss diet created around it – the “grapefruit diet!” Research has proven that grapefruit doesn’t have any magical weight loss properties, so don’t eat it just to lose weight. But… There is something you need to know about grapefruit if you take…

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If You Take Medications, You Need to Know About Grapefruit

Grapefruit is good for you! It’s a vitamin C-rich citrus fruit that’s low in sugar and contains vitamin A, potassium, and fibre. It has a low glycemic index and does not spike your blood sugar when you eat it. The pink and red varieties also contain lycopene. It’s definitely a nutritious health-promoting food. It even had a whole weight-loss diet created around it – the “grapefruit diet!” Research has proven that grapefruit doesn’t have any magical weight loss properties, so don’t eat it just to lose weight. But… There is something you need to know about grapefruit if you take…

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Prebiotics 101

“Pre”biotics? Yes! They’re the food that we feed our probiotics, the friendly gut microbes that are oh so important for good health. Our gut microbes are alive, and they need to eat too. Their favourite foods are called “prebiotics” and include dietary fibre and resistant starch. The same fibre that keeps us feeling full slows down digestion and provides roughage that keeps us regular. Resistant starch helps promote healthy blood lipids. Both of types of prebiotics (fibre and resistant starch) are linked with many health benefits. Technically-speaking, a prebiotic has three qualities: It needs to be undigested and reach the…

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